Charisma is More Important than Life Itself

10th Apr 2014, 12:00 AM in The Cage
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Charisma is More Important than Life Itself
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Author Notes:

Apprenticebard 10th Apr 2014, 12:00 AM edit delete
I'm done with these witticisms about roleplaying. I just want to talk about Star Trek. Again. Guys this is great I can talk about Star Trek all the time now

After making these comics, this part of the ending is the only part of the episode that still bothers me. She's just like "I'm ugly!" And they all accept that as a perfectly legitimate reason why she can't leave Talos. Lots of people are deformed, and we don't leave them stranded with alien species that have tortured them for years. The idea that Vina's injuries make her unable to reintegrate into society just does not square with the whole "idealized version of the future" thing.
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plymayer 10th Apr 2014, 12:08 AM edit delete reply
plymayer
The thing is, they really did love her and want her to be happy. As a pet perhaps? And they did need her to reclaim the surface.

Because she loved them, she wanted to help them. That might have been hard for her to admit to other humans.
Apprenticebard 10th Apr 2014, 7:46 PM edit delete reply
She was willing to give her life with the others to stop them from kidnapping other humans- by the end, there's no question that the Talosians aren't going to try another repopulation scheme. She *did* tell Pike not to hurt them because they didn't mean to be evil (rather the opposite of Leah's priorities), but there's no real getting around the fact that they torture her when she doesn't obey.

On the other hand, Vina is a cool guest character (especially compared to most of the women Kirk runs into during his adventures), and I admit that her actual motivations are probably way more complicated than what's presented here. Perhaps the ending was more a mutual act of selflessness between Vina and the Talosians- that's certainly a much more uplifting interpretation than "the future is bright, but not for injured people."